Wildflower Haiku

Bluebonnets_Haiku

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About Suzanne Gunter McClendon

I am a South Carolina native now living on the Texas Gulf Coast. I have been married to David for just over 32 years. We have 4 surviving adult children and two children-in-law. At this point in our lives, we are adjusting to an empty nest. I enjoy reading, writing, photography, digital art, fiber arts, and much, much more.
Image | This entry was posted in Haiku, Poetry, Wildflowers. Bookmark the permalink.

22 Responses to Wildflower Haiku

  1. WOW, that’s gorgeous.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you. I appreciate that very much. 🙂 The flowers were photographed earlier this year at the wildflower field of the local Presbyterian church.
      The haiku was prompted by thoughts of the day that our youngest son left for the US Marine Corps.
      Have a blessed weekend. 🙂

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      • Oh my…such a poignant inspiration for the haiku. Lovely photo too 🙂 Oh yes, the weekend is nearly here–and we’re supposed to cool down (Seattle area). I don’t do HOT temps well–and today I was “whining in the Spirit” about it! Blessings to you and your husband, Suzanne ❤

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        • Thank you. 🙂 I do hope that you get cooler weather. We have endured a horribly hot summer. We don’t really get a fall or winter here. It is almost always summer-like. We reached a heat index of 123 degrees one day. Thankfully, that has backed off a bit. It only got to 105 degrees today (heat index). You have a whining buddy because I can’t deal with the heat either. Blessings to you and your family, too. Thank you. 🙂

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          • My dear cousin lives in Cypress, TX–we visit on the phone and exchange stories about the heat (as well as faith, and lots of laughter)! Of course, she has AC–and I do not, I have about 8 fans now…wind tunnel effect (can’t hear myself think) blowing hot air around 🙂 🙂 Here in western Wash, we get a Heat Advisory if the temp is high 80’s-low 90’s; and in eastern Wash, triple-digit summer temps are the norm. I crave the cooler, rainy days–love to cook big pots of soup or yummy casseroles–it’s harder to cook for hot weather 🙂 Sorry for jabbering away, as though we’re on the phone! Blessings ❤

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          • You’re fine. 🙂 My fingers are often Chatty Cathy fingers, too. haha
            I don’t know how you stand it without an air conditioner! I am glad that your cousin has it, especially with her being down here. Here’s to cooler days and soon! Blessings to you, too. 🙂

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          • Well, we really don’t have much hot weather–it just seems like it when I’m dripping sweat. (Although I’ve always been hot-blooded, and the “flashes” add to the fun.) People look at me like I’m crazy, as I wear sandals all year–unless we get a brief few inches of snow; and I haven’t worn a heavy jacket for decades. My apartment is very small (low-income housing), but it’s upstairs, so gets toasty. Thank you for your generous blessings–know that they are also sent to you 🙂

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          • Thank you. We have something else in common – I wear sandals all year long, too. 🙂 I don’t think it is crazy at all. Have a wonderful day!

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          • I should have enlarged on the ‘crazy’ aspect–other Seattle area folks bundle up, I mean seriously: parkas, boots, the works–at the least little chill breeze or shower. So, standing at the crosswalk together, I’m an interesting contrast in my T-shirt, sandals and thin cotton pants 🙂 One of my neighbors used to ask me, with a measure of concern, “don’t you own a coat?” I had to explain the whole “I don’t want to be dripping sweat by the time I walk the block to Safeway, by wearing a jacket just because it’s 65 degrees” story. This apparently required a short note about menopause, and being half-Cajun (extra hot spicy blood). He seems to feel shivery, just looking at my lack of what he deems “appropriate” seasonal wardrobe items 🙂 You have a great day too–Happy Friday!!

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          • The people around here start freaking out as it gets closer to 70. They act like we’re having a blizzard. They wear fur parkas and boots…but get this, they wear these with what I call “booty shorts”…very short shorts and a parka? I guess their legs don’t get cold. Too weird.
            I very rarely wear sweaters. I don’t wear long sleeves. I am almost always running hot. I am at the “M” word, too. I have hot flashes, but I also have cold flashes (which no one ever warned me about…you only ever hear of hot flashes). Sometimes the cold flashes are colder than the hot flashes are hot. Either way, I end up sweaty. I don’t like sweaty. Maybe we’ll get through this stage quickly. 🙂
            Happy Friday to you, too. 🙂

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          • Ohhh, you’re cracking me up!! Yeah, I too have wondered about those gals with way too short shorts…and fur jackets. I don’t even own a sweater–I have 2 very light-weight flannel shirts which suffice nicely in winter for those walks up to Safeway. And I have noticed that weird ricochet from hot to cold on occasion, but I’m usually only cold when I’m over-tired. We must be kin somewhere along the line, as “sweaty” is just about the worst for my overall physical/mental/emotional/spiritual condition 🙂 I’m glad utilities are included in my rent–I can take as many showers as I want, and turn the heat on and off all day long! 🙂 We’ll get through it, but “quickly”–I’m not betting on it 🙂 xxoo

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          • These days, I am having more cold flashes than hot flashes. I can tell the difference between a hot/cold flash and regularly being too hot or too cold because I can’t do anything at all to improve my perception of temperature when it is a flash. So, I have days full of sweaty melting from the insane temps here, plus cold flashes just to excite the day. 🙂 Here’s to you not getting over-tired so that you can avoid these flashes. I’m glad you can adjust your heat however you need to, too, and take showers however often you want to. 🙂
            How long have you been on the M journey? I have officially been on it for about 6 years now. I have no clue how long it is supposed to last before I am free to be sane again. 🙂

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          • As to length of M-season/journey, I guess even the experts can’t say for certain. My saintly cousin is in her late 70’s and reports that she “thinks” her flashes may be abating… As for me, I’m turning 64 in late Sept, and stayed on hormone therapy until my uncaring healthcare people would no longer pay for the pill that worked so well–this was several years ago. Then my Dr agreed to give me estrogen…but when I reported the bleeding, he took me off it.

            I never prayed so hard in my life, fearing that no HRT would mean I’d jump off a bridge…after systematically mowing down my entire neighborhood with an Uzzi. So I suspect we’ll need to find and maintain our joint sanity somewhere in the Word (note the somewhat doubtful tone). It amuses me when preachers talk about how Jesus experienced/suffered Everything that we do…um, I don’t mean to argue with His anointed, but I strongly suspect our Lord missed out on specifically female health issues…. 🙂

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          • I just turned 51 last week. As far back as I know, none of my foremothers had a natural occurring journey. My mother and I were both surgically altered, her due to precancer, me due to tumors (not cancerous at the time). My maternal grandma was given an experimental medicine at age 29 because of something that happened when my youngest aunt was born that thrust her immediately into M. My paternal granny was surgically altered as well. I have no clue about my great-grandmothers. I feel like I’m thrust blindly into this with no clue what to expect or how to prepare our daughters for it. I can’t even tell them when to expect it.
            I’m sorry that you’ve had so much trouble getting the medicine that worked well for you. Insurance companies don’t care about anything but money. 😦
            While Jesus didn’t go through the womanly things throughout His life, I do believe that when He was in the garden preparing for the cross, He felt all of the feelings involved with every aspect of our human lives, including the moodiness and hot/cold flashes, etc. I could be wrong, though. 🙂 I hate to think of all that He suffered in our stead. What an awesome Brother we have!

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          • He is awesome, for sure–and I don’t like to think of all He suffered for me… If you have the option of selecting a really good female ob-gyn, that’s probably your best bet on getting good info and help with symptoms. Being low-income, my healthcare is pretty useless. So I rely on our Healer for everything, and stubbornly refuse to have any issues necessitating medical intervention 🙂

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          • We are low-income, too. David is disabled due to his diabetes and additionally due to three strokes suffered back in May. I haven’t been back to a regular doctor since I lost my insurance after the tumors. Like you, I pray for Heavenly Father to take care of it and, if He isn’t going to heal me on this earth, that He will take me quickly with minimal suffering. Nobody gets out of this world alive anyway. 🙂

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          • Perhaps because I’m alone (nothing and no one to remain here for), I have zero desire to continue residing on this un-peaceful earth. I’m eager to go Home–and like you, I’d prefer “quick, and minimal suffering”. I wonder if David keeps a good spirit about him, which of course will impact yours–and vice versa. Chronic illness can play havoc with moods, no matter how devout our faith.

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          • I share your feelings about not wanting to stay here. I don’t want to desert my family, but I don’t want the suffering that is ahead if I am not healed of the COPD. It scares me.
            We both have our moments, good ones and bad, and, yes, it most definitely affects our moods. It is difficult to always be happy and present a happy face when you’re in incredible pain or discomfort, or frustrated because you can’t communicate what you’re trying to say, or you forget what you’re saying in the middle of saying it. Those things can lead to some pretty cranky or hurtful moments.

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          • Yes, it’s not easy.

            Liked by 1 person

  2. eliwoodbine says:

    A very poignant little piece of writing.

    Thanks for sharing 🙂

    Eli.

    Liked by 1 person

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